Friday, January 01, 2010

Linkagery

Yes, I'm even more incredibly behind on doing this. But, since there's no way I'll get anything accomplished today with football on, I might as well do this.

The most important link I have is this first one, and it's actually recent: the list of players who will not be free agents if I'm declared God-Emperor of Japan this week there's no new CBA deal before the start of a league year. What will this mean? For example, no salary floor.

The second most important link is this one, which will be a burgeoning issue the next couple weeks and months: the NFL may not have coaches' tape on college games unless it forks over a fair amount of money. Linking to this, I can't help myself but also link to this precious article on WNBA players actually watching game film because it's important.

Courtesy of Wayne Winston, whose book Mathletics I may or may not get around to reading, a history of point value models in football. Yes, that's your truly in the first comment, and I suspect Jim Armstrong is the second comment.

NFP's rank of the top 30 prospects as of October 21. See also SNT's list as of October 29.

Still raising my blood pressure: dumb article from WSJ on the NFL salary cap, and how it doesn't work because some times were winning games by a lot and other teams were bad. More interesting, really, is the beating Vegas took from the same problem.

Neat little info on how the Pats manipulated the salary cap rules with Tully Banta-Cain, courtesy of Andrew Brandt. I rip on the Pats a lot, but this isn't one of those times; they took advantage of a bad rule, which should be fixed. See also Brandt's next column, which includes more details on Cutler's new deal mentioned in the previous link. Related to the rules manipulation issue, the problem is when the rule-enforcing and-making authority can exercise its power capriciously. Like, say, the NCAA.

Really great post by Joe Posnanski on Larry Johnson, after he sent his tweet about Haley not playing the game, going into Chiefs and LJ's recent history. Carl Peterson may have had a worse 2003-08 than Matt Millen, if you really think about it.

Great title: 85,000 fans doesn't equal a plan, from Bob Boland's column on the NFL and expansion beyond the US. Honest answer, from me personally: they shouldn't expend that much effort on it, but instead concentrate on not screwing up their core business model. Plus, London games are a pain in the butt. For example, this change, permitting a majority owner to control as little as 10% of a team, down from 30% in 2004, is a much bigger deal. That sort of stultification is much more important than not taking the game abroad.

Cool recap of the 1969 Red River Shootout from Prolate Spheroid, one of the most notable games in that rivalry.

Neat column by Andrew Brandt on Favre's history with the Packers, and Ted Thompson's difficulty in connecting with Favre. See also Brandt's next column, about how Brett got so much love from the TV guys because he was such a great resource for them. Not surprising, as anybody familiar with Bob Woodward could easily surmise.

Data dump from PFR: most rush yards by no. of carries, prompted by MJD's 177 on 8 carries against the Titans.

If I noticed more about technique, this post in improving a QB's throwing motion would be a really great read.

The Big 10 is the NFL. Why do I say this? It's fairly simple: the B10's strength is determined by the strength of its quarterbacks. When the B10 has good quarterbacks, it's a great league. When it has mediocre to poor quarterbacks, as it has for the past couple years, it's a down league.

Finally, for now, something cool: if there was a mythical college football victory cup, awarded to the winner of the first game and subsequently captured by defeating that school (think Harry Potter Deathstick), who would have had it over time. Since the chart went up, Florida lost it to Alabama. Past holders who will never hold it again include West Virginia Wesley, UChicago, and Olympic Club.

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